How to Edit Out Glare From Glasses Using Photoshop

Picture source: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/877183

As you can see in this picture, there is a lot of glare in this boy’s glasses. Although it may be tricky, you can remove the glare using Photoshop.

Step One: The Tools

There are a couple of tools that people like to use to remove glare: The clone stamp tool and the healing brush. The shortcut for the clone stamp tool is “S” and the shortcut for the healing brush is “J”. For both tools, you need to collect a sample area. Press the ALT key to select a part of the picture that you want to copy over the glare with. Ideally, you want the sample area to be very close to the affected area. That way the same color and texture is being copied over. It’s important to take very short strokes and keep selecting new sample areas as you progress.

The clone stamp only fixes the affected area with the source sample. The healing brush takes some of the texture that surrounds the affected area and mixes it with the source sample. That is the only difference between the healing brush and the stone clamp tool. You should experiment with both because not every picture can be cured using the same methods from previous projects.

To effectively remove glare, you want to use these tools in very short strokes and the picture should be zoomed in to work more efficiently.

If an eye was affected by glare, I would copy the other eye to place over the glared eye and touch it up with the healing brush or clone stamp tool. However, both eyes are glare-free, so it is not necessary for me to make copied selections of an eye.

Step Two: The Process

Select the clone stamp tool and make a copied layer of the original. You always want to save your work to protect your project. You want to make the first copied layer to work with. Save the original for reference and backup.

Zoom in until you feel like you have enough canvas to work with. Your canvas should primarily consist of the glare and sample sources you can use to remove the glare. If there is too much glare, you may to select some copies of similar skin textures with the lasso tool to place over the glare. Since there are a lot of sample sources in this picture, I did not need to select copies of skin.

Make sure you zoom out once in a while to see how your work is going. You may need to backtrack and redo some parts. By now, I have used both tools, but I’m primarily sticking with the clone stamp tool. The healing brush is taking texture samples that do not mix well.

Make sure the new skin tone matches other skin tones around it. If it doesn’t, the picture won’t look authentic. You may want to lower the opacity of the clone stamp tool to help the skin tones blend and match.

Step Three: The Finishing Touches

About midway through it, I made another copied layer. It acted like a “save point.” The boy’s right eyebrow was the hardest to effectively fix since there was not much sample sources for it.

I used the healing brush for a couple of spots near the frame. For the most part, I just made sure that the skin tones were even.

Removing glare may be a little tricky for beginners, but with enough practice, it is possible. Not every picture can be treated the same way, so it’s important to learn different ways to remove glare. One technique I did not use was copying other patches of skin or textures. This can be an effective way to remove glare as well.

Sara Roberts writes for Just Eyewear, a discount eyeglasses and prescription sunglasses online retailer.

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

DIY Fashion Ideas that can Save You Hundreds

DIY fashion is becoming the reality for many people now who just need to save some cash when it comes to their wardrobes. Even if you aren’t normally the crafty type, you can certainly learn to do a little bit to dress up your wardrobe without spending a fortune. If you’re getting a little bored or just flat out need new clothes, learning how to do things yourself could save you hundreds.

You don’t always need knitting needles or a sewing machine to make DIY fashion work, either. In fact, some projects are pretty simple. It’s a good idea to start small and work your way up if you aren’t sure how to use some of the more hardcore DIY equipment.

Something to start with might be your accessories. How much do you bet you spend in a year on headbands, necklaces, bracelets, and other accessories? You can save a fortune by making your own or dressing up what you’ve already got.

For instance, there are about a hundred online tutorials showing you how to take a bit of fabric or lace and make one of those giant headband or hat flowers that are so popular right now. All you need is a glue gun or a safety pin, and you can take a headband or had you already have and transform it into something totally new.

Learning how to do your own beading can be fun, too. With the chunky, layered necklaces that are in right now, you don’t even have to worry about lots of intricate design work. Simply lay out your beads in the order you want them, and string them on. Learn how to neatly tie on a clasp, and you’re good to go.

Another popular way to save through DIY fashion is to upcycle items. Check out places like Goodwill and Salvation Army for clothes that aren’t quite your style. You can find tons of ways to update them, make them fit better, or turn them into something new altogether.

For instance, a tee-shirt that’s a bit too large and a scarf can be turned into a super-cute cami with just a bit of sewing. Simply slice of the top of the tee-shirt just below the neckline. Use the sleeves to make a binding around your new neckline, and string the scarf through the neck in front and back. It sounds a little difficult if you’ve never sewn, but it’s really a pretty simple project. (http://diystyle.net/projects/fashion/tee-to-cami/)

A Few Things to Remember

Before you get into DIY fashion, there are a few things you need to remember. Here are just a few tips to help you save even more on your new DIY fashion adventure:

  1. Look online for tutorials. Sure, you can go buy books about how to make your own clothes and accessories, but that sort of defeats the purpose because you’re already spending too much money! Instead, look online for free tutorials to get you started. Libraries also have lots of DIY books that could be helpful in learning basic techniques. Once you get the basics down, you can make up your own projects with just a bit of creativity.
  2. Don’t try it all at once. Trying too many things at once can be frustrating – and expensive! Start with one thing, like beading or knitting, and get the hang of it before moving on to something new. This gives you the chance to really understand one art before moving on to the next. Plus, you’ll save on materials and equipment. Start with just the bare bones basics to find out if you like a new craft so you don’t end up with lots of unnecessary stuff cluttering your crafting room and your budget.
  3. Save on your materials and equipment. Saving on materials is simple for most things. Craft stores like Hobby Lobby and Jo-Ann Fabrics offer great discounts every week. Just sign up for their newsletters or check the store frequently. Once you get really good, you won’t buy anything without a coupon! You can also get materials from Goodwill for super cheap, and these will work for many upcycling projects. To save on equipment like your sewing machine and such, buy used off of eBay or Craigslist until you know exactly what you like and need and can splurge on something pricier.

This article was contributed by Abigail Hall.  She is a writer at the consumer credit card website, www.creditdonkey.com.  Visit CreditDonkey to earn cash back on your next fashion purchase.

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

How To Create a Memorable TV Commercial

3 examples of great TV commercials

Commercials are a huge part of our society. Not only are they trendsetters and good fodder for water cooler talk, but they reflect culture and what is going on at that given time period.  

Not all commercials achieve this kind of impact though. It takes a really creative and memorable commercial to truly achieve success.  Every minute of every day, millions of people are inundated with ads in many different forms: online, radio, print and television. Yet nothing seems to have the same impact as the TV commercial.

Here’s a look at three of the best creative and memorable commercials in recent years and why they are successful.

Dr. T’s Slug and Snail Killer

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMssG-66oTE?rel=0&w=500&h=314]

A great commercial doesn’t have to be extravagant. This awesome spot for slug and snail killer is just a monologue. But it is extremely well written and the acting is brilliant. If this isn’t a perfect human rendition of a slug then I don’t know what is! Viewers aren’t soon to forget about this slug.

Nike

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF1Pbf2Mdbc?rel=0&w=500&h=314]

On the other hand, brands with gigantic budgets can still produce breathtaking commercials.  Again, it isn’t so much the special effects or CGI that makes this great — the concept is simple. What defines this Nike spot is the music and fast-changing images that strike an emotional cord with a variety of audiences. Just putting in a quick shot of famous runner Steve Prefontaine, for example, creates an emotional connection with all runners even if the commercial has a broader target.

Google

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rS4Lb-ie4Lc?rel=0&w=500&h=314]

Sometimes commercials don’t have to say anything at all. This awesome Super Bowl spot from Google – their first ever – puts the viewer in the drivers seat and tells an entire story through the use of their product. This is a common tactic in TV advertising. Much like the Nike ad, an emotional connection is created through the use of a product.

The real answer, as cliché as it seems, is that there is not one right way to make a great advertisement. People have tried many different strategies. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don’t. Strive to tell great stories in your commercials. Create emotional bonds that are hard to forget. Regardless of format or style, if you do these things the ad will be a hit.

It doesn’t take a huge budget or a powerhouse brand to create a great TV spot either. Simplicity rules. Just look at the examples above! Regardless of budget, if the ad is created properly you have nothing to worry about.

Trevin is a freelance writer and TV fanatic.

 

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Choosing Graphic Design Work that Matches Your Values

How do you make sure that your work fits in line with your personal ethics? Although this is a post targeting designers and artists, almost every working person deals with this issue at some point. You might have seen a colleague who thinks it’s “just business”. And chances are you don’t trust this person, even if it seems like they’re a fine upstanding citizen outside of work.  When taking a job, full time or client based, do you think about the clients ethics?

What are work values?

These are the set of beliefs that you’ve acquired over your life. Mom and dad instilled you with a sense of right and wrong.  There’s nothing worse than feeling like you have to do something you’re fundamentally against to survive or because you’ve agreed to a job you don’t agree with.

Evaluating Your Client

First of all, let’s qualify this by saying you should understand your potential employer. Go in with an open mind.  Sure this company may have a bad reputation in your industry for it’s practices, but without discussing it with them and doing your research you don’t really know if it’s a good fit. If you’re hoping for repeat business, ask your client about any potential for more work.

Core Ethics

Take the time right now to do a self assessment. Figure out what your core ethics are. Perhaps it’s important to you that you have a certain amount of autonomy with your projects.  Accept nothing less.  There are clients out there that will trust you to complete the work.  I’ve designed marketing projects where I’ve heard very little from the client and they’re happy with the end results. Your dream client is out there.  Imagine that you want autonomy and have no part in the decision making process. How upset will you be?  Imagine if you thrive in variety and have to do a monotonous job.

In the end, you won’t be truly happy with your work unless you’re following your own morality. It’s not just business, it’s a huge part of your life.  Figure out what’s really important and use that knowledge in your decision making.  Say no to the clients and career moves that don’t match up.

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Finding Your Calling in the Working World

 A degree can’t promise success in your career path, but it can help you make tremendous strides toward achieving it, especially if you truthfully answer the questions below.

Do you have an idea of the goal or goals you want to accomplish?

Having a medical degree does not mean you have to become a doctor; it can encompass others areas, such as research, practice administration or even the pharmaceutical field. Likewise, a business degree does not necessarily mean “9-to-5” hours in an office environment. However, having a goal makes it easier to narrow your choices and direct your focus more fully when you start out on your career path.

Whose goals are they?

Are the goals truly yours, or are you trying to please someone else? Ultimately, you are going to be the one who is working in this career. And, that applies to family-owned businesses, as well as other ones. If you discover that you want to pursue another career path, the sooner you are honest with yourself and everyone involved, the better off you will be.

What do you really want to accomplish?

Do you want to have a career that allows you to live comfortably but still have plenty of leisure time? Or do you want to be the one to make the next big discovery, no matter what field it is in? Only you can answer these questions, or at least ones similar to them that will help you determine your career path.

How disciplined are you?

Do you, or are you willing, to keep going even when things start getting rough? Or do you try to avoid conflict and difficulties? Do you need to become more disciplined? Be honest with yourself when answering these questions. That’s the only way you’re going to be able to make plans and set goals that can be accomplished.

How flexible are you?

You may enter and leave college with a clear goal in mind, but circumstances can happen that will cause you to have to make a complete change. However, you may realize once you are into your new career that this was actually your goal all along. So, be willing to change, if necessary.

Have you done your homework?

Not just your college homework, but do research into your career and those that are, or can be, connected with it. There is no substitute for practical experience, but gaining as much knowledge as possible will certainly be an asset.

Again, this can apply to family businesses as well. You may think there is not one more thing you can learn about running a restaurant or building houses, or whatever it is your family has always done, but changes happen every day.

You may have always had a dream of what you wanted to do with your life. Examine yourself honestly, using the questions in this article and others as a guideline, and you will most likely find that dream becoming a reality.

Elysabeth Teeko is a lover of technology, interior decorating and design. She’s recently started blogging about these interests, and you can follow her on Twitter @elysateek

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.