How do you become a prolific artist? 8 secrets no one says outloud

Last month I attempted my first plein air painting in Montrose Park in Washington, DC. I was very nervous and had a lot of doubt: “I’m supposed to be an artist! I have a degree in art! I work as an art director and I’m a good painter. Why is this scary?!”

Whenever we’re doing something new, it’s still a test of wills. The same lessons come back to us every time. No one tells you it’ll be easy, yet they don’t exactly proclaim to you how hard being an artist can be. Here’s the final painting which is no masterpiece and at the same time I learned a ton and felt proud about it:

First time trying plein air! Learned a ton while doing it!

A photo posted by – Brian E. Young (@sketcheeguy) on

1. It’s okay to procrastinate

Prolific artists procrastinate. Procrastinating is a form of thinking. You’re doing one thing like watching tv or playing video games, and you’re distracted thinking you could be painting or drawing. It is okay to procrastinate. You’re still thinking about your art. Use whatever you’re doing to find inspiration. Write down any thoughts you might have.

I thought about plein air painting for years. Even had planned to last fall at a plein air painting event. It started to become a big deal in my head. I thought I needed the right supplies, the absolutely right event, the right motivation, and the right place. It turns out all I needed to do was go outside.

Try this: Write down your goals and ideas. While you’re procrastinating, while you’re in the super market, while you’re at work just stop for a split second and jot down the note such as “I want to paint trees.” “I want to sketch people.” You can use a cellphone app or tweet it or text it to all of your friends. Next time you’re finding yourself free and tempted to reach for your television remote, you’ll be more likely to know that you really would rather sketch and paint.

Read this: Awesome Secrets to Super Inspired Procrastination

“You can’t just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood. What mood is that? Last-minute panic.” Bill Watterson

2. It’s okay to be be messy

Prolific artists make messy sketches and thumbnails. I use stick figures in my thumbnails to quickly get ideas down. Stick figures are a cute and fun way to draw out an idea and not care if it’s a masterpiece. Even though I’m a trained artist with a degree in art and a job in art, I still use stick figures. These poses can be further developed into bigger and better drawings later. Once I see an idea as a concrete thumbnail, it really helps me to get excited about it.

When I worked on my first plein air painting, I quickly was disheartened by the composition I chose. I didn’t really think about it much. I didn’t do any planning. I just looked in a direction and started making marks with paint. That’s okay! I learned something from that! Next time, it would have been smart to take 60-seconds to scribble down a few different compositions. There is no mistake if we can’t learn from it.

Try this: Take 60 seconds to create 3 thumbnails before making anything “real”. You’ve heard this and yet you still don’t do it. I preach this for years and I still didn’t do it. Practice it, make it routine. It’s just a fun way to break the ice. Don’t look at it as a must, an obligation, or as pressure. This is the fun part where you get to be a child and not care about the result. Make them and ignore them. Make them and learn from them.

Read this: Acrylic Painting Tutorial: How to use thumbnails for inspiration

“We all have 10,000 bad drawings in us. The sooner we get them out the better.” Walt Stanchfield

3. It’s okay to fail

Prolific artists are persistent when facing failure. It’s only a failure if you give up without learning anything. Don’t give into your fear and doubt. Be persistent and decide on the next step. Be nicer to yourself.

After a night of painting, I often will feel discouraged. The painting didn’t look exactly how I imagined it could. The next morning, in the light of day I will look at it and say wow that actually looks pretty cool. It’s different yet something about it works. I’m ready to take last nights failure and make the adjustments needed to get the painting finished.

There is a lot I didn’t like about my first plein air painting. The composition is centered and uninteresting, the colors are brighter than I wanted, and I wish it had more depth. How do I know this? I know it because I tried. I tried and now have something physical to look at. Through those experiences, I’ll have a better idea when I try this again. And I will try it again.

Try this: Fail at something you’re afraid of. If you’re afraid to paint, then paint. I used to be afraid of asking for help at the grocery store. I know it’s silly, there are people there to help you and they’re friendly. Still I was afraid of it. Then I just learned to ask anyway. Whenever you’re afraid and you have all of the reasons that failure is possible, just do it anyway.

Listen to this: Face The Fear of Failure in 6 Steps: The Uncanny Creativity Podcast, Episode 31

“First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice.” Octavia E. Butler

4. It’s okay to take breaks

Prolific artists take breaks and then just pick up where they left off. We retain information better when we have space away from it. Ever have trouble remembering something? The best thing to do is to stop focusing on that thought and return to it. What happens is that we focus on the idea that we can’t remember so much that we can’t actually process the memory. We often find things when we aren’t looking for them.

When we’re focused on the thought “I forgot”, “I feel guilty for forgetting”, or some variation, it just makes it that much harder to remember and reinforces our “I have a bad memory” persona. Let go of that! You walk away from that guy at the gym who’s name you forgot, then remember it that night while doing dishes. Yes, this has happened to me.

When I was painting outside in the beautiful park in Washington, DC, it turned out to be insanely helpful to just say to myself “Wow, this is a beautiful day and I’m lucky to be here.” See all that was around me and know that I’m inspired by it all. The memory of that is a good one. Practicing a bit of gratitude can help fix any situation or problem. There’s always a lot to be thankful for, don’t miss it!

Try this: Focus on one task for a block of time. Then take a break. One study shows the best in their field only practice for 90-minute blocks (PDF link). If you are going to return to the task after the break, try to take at least 20 minutes focused on anything else. Do your best to focus on your new task. If your mind wanders back to work, be nice to yourself and bring your attention back to what you’re doing now. If you’re taking your lunch break, you might just focus on the taste, sound, and look of your meal. If your break is another type of work, try to give it your full attention.

Listen to this: Picking Up Where You Left Off: The Uncanny Creativity Podcast, Episode 30

“Every person needs to take one day away.  A day in which one consciously separates the past from the future.  Jobs, family, employers, and friends can exist one day without any one of us, and if our egos permit us to confess, they could exist eternally in our absence.  Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solutions searched for.  Each of us needs to withdraw from the cares which will not withdraw from us.” Maya Angelou

5. It’s okay to have hope

Prolific artists are positive. Optimism boosts creativity. One of the easiest ways to find a silver lining is to understand what we are grateful for. Yeah somethings in life suck and you’re okay for feeling that way. At the same time, those bad things don’t have to outweigh the good things. A realistic approach is ultimately healthy and positive. Reaching an understanding on how to balance the good and bad thoughts you might have will put you into a better place to make decisions and not cave under pressure.

Now I have a better understanding of how my thoughts and feelings play out when I’m painting in a more public situation. I’m used to painting at home, by myself. The only critic I deal with there is me. Now I understand that the critic even when there are others in the park asking about my work is still just me. Only I give their words any meaning. Most onlookers in a park are probably wishing they were bold enough to be there. By painting, I’m already brave enough to do something that many people never tried. By even reading this article, you’re contemplating ideas that many people would be too afraid to even consider.

Try this: Learn something new. Look at a situation or experience you found challenging and use this as a chance to learn something new. Next time you’re in a similar situation, what will you do differently? The past can’t be changed and the future can.

Read this: You’re not an innovator and you never will be: 7 Reasons

“Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible.” – Albert Einstein

6. It’s okay to have bad ideas

Prolific artists create first and judge second. Put an idea down, try it out, see what happens. It’s okay to be average. Your first idea is rarely your best. This is why we sketch (see number 2) so that we can work out the best idea. Even if your best idea was your first one, creating a few bad concepts can solidify your choice and help you feel stronger about your final drawing.

Try this: Brainstorm without judgement. Write down all of your thoughts as a quick list before starting on an intimidating or time-consuming task. The thoughts might be completely related or really stupid. Make a point to include the ones that usually feel very uncomfortable. Facing that discomfort and writing it down is part of the fun. It’s now just words on paper without any meaning.

Read this: 5 Steps to Having More Creative Ideas

“The way to get good ideas is to get lots of ideas and throw the bad ones away.” Linus Pauling (Nobel Peace Prize winner)

7. It’s okay to improvise

Prolific artists make it up as they go along. We give up the idea of how we once thought it “should” be and move on to how to make things work. Every brush stroke is a fresh start.

I painted my trees, even as I realized the composition didn’t work. I could have left or just started over. Those would have been great ways to improvise too. I just chose to continue and that made all the difference.

Try this: Finish what you start. No matter how you are feeling about a project, rather than give up find a way to complete it. It might be as simple as signing your name and calling it done. Your usual next step doesn’t have to be the next step you take. Do something that isn’t obvious.

Read this: Can Improv Teach Us About Graphic Design?

“In the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.” Charles Darwin

8. It’s okay to ask for help

Prolific artists are part of a team. You have a support system, friends, family, coworkers, and a professional network who you can rely on. They may not even be part of your art, they just may help you be a whole person. The people in our lives help us by inspiring us, by helping us with conversations, by showing us love and affection. Having confidence in more parts of life helps us realize our abilities. Be prepared to not get the help you want and still be happy that there is someone who will listen to the question. Ask for exactly what you want and need.

By now you’re probably tired of hearing about how I created that painting. I didn’t do it alone, I am lucky enough to have someone in my life who enjoys painting as much as I do. We went to the park together and created very different work. It’s really nice to just spend time with the people you care about. At the end of the day, it wasn’t about painting at all. That day was about a new experience. Create experiences, not just things and not just images.

Try this: Reach out to someone you love. Provide help, a listening ear, or a fun night out and give them everything they might need. You’ll see how much others love your help and create friendships that will be there when you’re in need too. The idea of reciprocity isn’t to just trade, it’s to give. Create a generous experience together with those you care about. When you’re genuinely interested in others, there is a beautiful impact on those around you.

Read this: 6 DOs and DON’Ts for Killer Creative Teams: Confession of a bad team player

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?”  Martin Luther King Jr.

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Practical Tips: Artists and Designers Networking Guide Part 2

Artists and Designers Networking Guide: Part 2 in this series focuses on practical advice that you can do right now to meet other artists. Jump to the other posts about networking:

We looked into how to get started with networking in the first part of this guide and what that really means. I can summarize that post in saying that real and practical networking means to forget about the word “networking” and start concentrating on having real quality relationships. If you have relationships with friends, family, and former coworkers where you’ve already established that you’re freely giving and receiving without pressure. You’re more focused on helping rather than receiving. One of the many parts of your friendship may just be professional or work related, though it isn’t the focus of your connection with any of them.

In the first part, I also introduced social networking’s role in maintaining and creating real life connections. There is an art in conversation to avoid being too pushy or too focused on yourself. You never know what your online interactions will lead to. Here’s a random example of how interacting with Baltimore Magazine’s Facebook page led to my little gem of a comment being printed:

 

Baltimore Magazine consulted the expert on office party etiquette.

A photo posted by – Brian E. Young (@sketcheeguy) on

 

I’m being very practical here because I think this such a vastly misunderstood topic. For part two, I wanted to focus on some real actionable tips that you can do today and everyday. You won’t be able to do all of these every day, though if you create these as frequent habits, you won’t think about the word “networking” much at all. You’ll just live life surrounded by people you care about and who you would help and perhaps could help you.Help people when you have nothing to gain.

How to talk to anyone

The key to talking to anyone is to focus on the other person when possible. I recently listened to the audiobook How to Talk to Anyone by Leil Lowndes and that the author’s main advice. How many conversations have you found where you didn’t feel that you were truly listened to? This is a gift we can give others that will help them see that we are their friend. I believe that the trick to focusing on others is becoming truly interested. Find what’s interesting about what they’re saying and lead the conversation there. Give them your undivided attention.

If they ask questions about you, feed their curiosity to do so. This shows that you’re listening and want to give them the information that they desire.

Dress the part.

Dress up, wear something that you feel confident in and feel special. Wear something special that people might even ask about so you won’t always be the one approaching them.

Ask for advice.

Others appreciate being seen as an expert, so ask them questions about what they’d recommend you do. This still keeps the focus on the artist and their event rather than making it about you. When asking for advice, try to focus on you’re asking them what you can do for yourself rather than asking for favors. Rather than ask for their help, ask how you can help yourself.

Focus on what you can do for them.

If an opportunity to help others and be a good friend arises, offer. Don’t be pushy. An offer that is turned down easily is seen as sincere! So even “rejection” is an opportunity to show that you’re helpful. You might ask if they have a website. If not and it’s something they want, you can offer to help them build one. Or let them know about a great service that is low maintence.

Be careful about monopolizing time.

Offer to let others out of a conversation if it feels you’ve been talking for a while. This is also a chance to offer to continue the conversation another time. If a phone number sounds more personal than the conversation would allow, ask if they have a website or Twitter or Facebook.

Listen.

Avoid being so overly prepared that you are just trying to talk about your talking points. Allow the other person to share the direction conversation. Be interested

Send a thank you.

Feel free to contact the artist via social media or even exchange contact information if the conversation is intense enough.

How to Visit Art Galleries

If you’re near a city or even a fairly well populated area, you’ll have many local art galleries who are open to provide a service to the art community. Galleries have free events, art receptions, and concerts. This is a perfect setting for artists and designers to practice your skills, meet other creatives and talk about your art. The people who attend are already interested in the same things as you. Not only that, you’ll be able to see work to inspire you! I visit the local art galleries whenever I’m in a new town or city. If all else fails, t’s free entertainment.

Here’s an art gallery I visited in Chicago when I was there for a wedding that also sold vinyl, prints and posts from concerts. I had a great conversation about the staff and learned a little bit about the city and the area while I was there. Nothing forced, just natural conversation asking whatever I was curious about.

 

Show up at art openings and events. Dont expect too much, just brief conversations. Think of this as practice and play Otherwise just enjoy the art! Ask the artist questions about their art, focus entirely on them. Inevitably they may ask a little bit about you, use the chance to have two or three sentences about your artwork. Then gently focus back on them. Stay positive and focus on what you like or love. It may be their sense of color or even their bravery for simply being there

Talk with the gallery owner and staff. They tend to be very passionate about visual work, have a rich background, and a lot of inspiration and advice to give. You might be interested to know about the history of the space, how they decided to be in this career path, or to know what other events they have planned.

Share and talk on social media. Promote the events and shows you think are interesting, just like you do with your favorite restaurant or with other parts of your day. When you visit, take photos for instagram, tweet about the show, and connect.

Respond to call for artists. Make art and submit to any open calls that interest you. This one isn’t just for artists. Graphic designers take note that many designers create work for shows. If you illustrate or design something interesting, submit it to a show.

How to Volunteer

Look for volunteer work related to art, design or even other unrelated interests. This is a way to meet new people, introduce yourself as an artist. I play piano and often when I was in college would play piano at gallery openings. See my post on why you’d want to be a design volunteer for a more thorough explanation on how to gain work experience, portfolio pieces, education, confidence and friends through volunteer work.

How to Interact with Art Organizations

Find the local art and design organizations in your area. You can volunteer with your local chapter of AIGA, the professional association for design, without becoming a member. Many formal and informal organizations post to Craigslist and MeetUp.com with various art related activities as well. A simple google search for local events will give you a ton of ideas about what you can do.

How to Take Classes

They offer classes at galleries, art supply stores at a variety of local businesses. Anywhere you can go and see the same people more frequently will encourage more connection building. Once people are familiar with your face, you’re more likely to easily strike a conversation with them. Even if it’s to say “Hey, we’ve been in this class for a few weeks and haven’t talked! You seem really good at this!”

How to Freelance

Using freelance and paid side projects can be a great way to network and make money while doing it. Look for companies and organizations with a need and see what you can offer them. This is another place where the local Craigslist comes in handy as well as the major freelance sites.

Next: Following Up: Artists and Designers Networking Guide Part 3

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Art History Continues to Evolve

History isn’t static, even when it comes to art. Many artists we think of as famous today were unknown in their lifetimes. Even the ones who were quite successful had periods where they slipped back into obscurity.

I remember noticing many artists we read about in my African American Art History and Music classes in college didn’t have Wikipedia articles. That was over ten years ago. I didn’t want to use it as a primary source, of course. It would have been a helpful to have an idea of who I was reading about. Back then, I reformatted a lot of my homework and started or expanded a few articles. The community did a good job of making those additions readable up to some standard. The Philadelphia Museum of Art has teamed up with the Wikimedia Foundation to add over 50 African American Artists to Wikipedia.

We also have the ever changing history of the “master’s” as their paintings continue to resurface and exchange hands for exhobetant prices. Picasso’s painting of his second wife is estimated to be sold at auction for around $150 million.

“Modern man has been in search of a new language of form to satisfy new longings and aspirations – longings for mental appeasement, aspirations to unity, harmony, serenity – an end to his alienation from nature. All these arts of remote times or strange cultures either give or suggest to the modern artist forms which he can adapt to his needs, the elements of a new iconography.” 
Herbert Read, English anarchist, poet and literary critic

Germany has been hard at work restoring many paintings seized by the Nazi’s to the heirs of their World War II-age owners. Mattisse’s painting “Woman Sitting in Armchair” will be returned as Germany reached a settlement . Another looted painting by El Greco, “Portrait of a Gentleman” was also returned to the heir’s. Speaking of Nazis, one of Adolf Hitler’s own paintings is also up for auction.

In Romania, a Renoir painting was found in the former prime minister’s safeA painting that was suspected to be by Claude Monet has been authenticated. Using a special camera, experts were able to uncover Monet’s signature. It’s now the first Monet to be held in Finland.

Take a look at this video where art experts enjoy some prints from Ikea. Ikea has some good stuff, yet even people who are supposed to account for artistic taste won’t always hit the nail on the head.

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

How to Get Started: Artist and Designer Networking Guide Part 1

Artists and Designers Networking Guide: Part 1 in this series focusing on starting with connecting with other artists. Jump to the other posts about networking:

Networking is often a dirty word, yet it’s helpful for any professional to have others to look to for guidance, opportunities, and support. In that sense, what are network contacts really? They are just friends with a common interest. With any friendship, we have a lot more that we share than just our interests. We look at each other as people we care about.

The New York Times reports that sociologists since the 1950s have whittled likeliness of connections down to three principles: Proximity, Unplanned Interactions, and Privacy. How can you place yourself to be physically close, have unplanned interactions, and have others feel comfortable sharing with you? Focus on what you feel good about contributing to the people in your network. This will make the process so much easier. It’s not work if it’s something you genuinely enjoy, just like how you enjoy your other friendships, families and relationships.

“You can make more friends in two months by becoming really interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Which is just another way of saying that the way to make a friend is to be one.”

Dale Carnegie

If you’re like many artists, you might ave a bit of social phobia about meeting other artists. We don’t want people to see us as users or opportunists. The key to this is to be a good and giving friend first. What are you are willing to do for others without receiving anything in return? These are the kinds of acts that will make you a quality friend and networker while still protecting your own interests.

How to Start Networking Online

Once you have begun practicing art and have work to share, having an online presence helps with connecting. Why? Because when you start making life friends who share a professional interest, you’ll want to have a place to send them.

You can start small just by opening a free accounts on Twitter, Pinterest, Google Plus and a Facebook Like Page. Each of these sites are free. Pick your favorite of these sites. Start by exploring what others are doing and mimic what you like about their posts. As an artist, having even a simple yet beautiful website to display your work is a great tool. If you mention that you are an artist and anyone shows any curiosity, having a place to send them makes networking easy: “Hey what’s your number, I’ll text you my website and you can look at sometime if you want!”

“When you act as though you like someone, you start to really like them.”
Leil Lowndes, How to Talk to Anyone

Focus first on helping others. How can others benefit from your work? When I started the Uncanny Creativity podcast and this blog, it was really because I often read articles and take notes. I started thinking that others can benefit from what I find. Working as a designer over the years, I’ve discovered that coworkers often haven’t found the information that I have. Every creative struggles to find and create ideas. This helps when we feel as if I’m the only one who worries about my creative abilities. Showing that to others has been a drive that keeps my content focused on the readers.

How to Start With Your Existing Network

How much do you interact with the people you already know? Let’s think of a few small ways we can adjust creatively everyday when we have conversations. Do your friends, family, and coworkers know about your life as artist? Tell them you’re interested in meeting other artists and even discuss seeing this article, if it helps.

When I was younger, I rarely discussed my art much with my mom because I felt she didn’t seem to show much interest. Slowly over time, I started opening up and just saying I visited an art show, that I painted, and would give her art. Mentioning visiting a museum, art supplies, going to an art store, and just showing how it’s part of my day made us both comfortable. Her background is as an accountant, so she didn’t know much about art. Yet as my mom, she knows how to be supportive and to be a proud mom.

Let others offer their own unique points of view without having any expectations. Even if they don’t know anyone to connect you with, they can still be there for support as you’re trying new things.

Since you’re an imaginative person, come up with ideas of something every day that you can use to encourage connections with others. Check in with at least someone you already know. You might, for example, think of the people in your network who would benefit from knowing each other, offer to introduce them. If you were laid off, who are the first 5-10 people you’d contact? Make sure you regularly talk to them and not just when in need. Look at the people you spend the most time with. Make sure to invest invest in relationships who influence you positively.

How to Start Being Curious

Make it a habit to Google your interests, problems, and thoughts. Share the absolute best articles on these networks with some personal comment about why you love it. The other focus is to reply to your connections online to let them know you enjoyed what they share. Compliment them and share your thoughts on their posts. When I say share, I don’t mean just online. These are great topics to bring up in person too. “I saw a great article about that the other day!” Having your own interests are great for conversation and for understanding other people’s interests.

“Curiosity benefits our social and romantic lives. Curious people are often considered good listeners and conversationalists. In the early stages of a relationship, we tend to talk about our interests or hobbies. One reason for this is that people tend to equate “having many interests” with “interesting,” and for good reason. Curious people tend to bring fun and novelty into relationships.”
Ben Dean Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

I know this might sound mundane or obvious, and at the same time its great practice to say it outloud. Through reading articles, you’ll also have a lot more to talk about when you meet people in your industry. “Oh wow, you’re a sculptor? I was reading about new research on Michaelangelo’s David!” Friends online and off will start to see you as expert, because you’ll be one. Part of making connections with others is stating what you feel is obvious. To your surprise, you’ll out much of what you think isn’t so obvious to others.

How to Make Conversation

Being social isn’t just about trying to gain. We have to really be willing to give to others. One of the rarest and yet obvious gifts we all can give is to listen. Listening is a very engaged, dynamic and energy intensive action , showing our curiousity about what we hear, and reflecting how we’ve heard it. All successful conversation requires two active participants. Listening is more about finding a balance comfortable between speaking and not. The ideal balance will depend on both people. An outgoing person much not need as much feedback or want to be asked as many questions. A shy person might need more attention. Ideally, neither of you will feel pressured to “carry” the conversation.

“The more you engage and connect, the more engagement and connections you will have.”
Loren Weisman

Keep in mind that listening benefits both of you. You’ll learn more about how they interact and have clues on how to create a good balance by taking their views and words in account. People will be more excited to hear about your ideas if they feel theirs are heard. We all fear that we might not be listened to as much and while you can’t force others to listen to you, you can give them that comfort as a listener. Listening is a tool for collaborating with others effectively.

One of the simplest and often effective strategies for listening is to share a short and similar story in response when others talk. Often automated responses like “uh huh”, “yeah” and even “tell me more about that” won’t convey that you are listening or willing to give. Follow up your story with a question that asks them if they want to continue, “Oh wow, I went to the Bahamas last year and it was beautiful! What did you like most about it?”

How to Start Talking About Your Art

Be ready with a few a standard very brief introductions to your art to be explained to anyone you meet. Less is more and find the most natural places to mention it. Sometimes there won’t be a natural place, so you’ll have to allow yourself to delay or it might not be the right conversation or even eventually the right person. Match the level of conversation with the other person. If they seem super interested when you mention your work, follow the thread. If they are focused on other aspects. Follow them. This technique is  similar to improv, where you agree with what was said and add your own twist.

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”
Winston S. Churchill

Most of all, be ready to fail gracefully. You might just be so excited about a painting you’re working on and just have to say “I’m so passionate about my work sometimes, I get caught up. Anyway tell me more about your trip?” Conversations can be tricky and don’t always go according to how we might practice. Definitely I’ve learned to laugh at that part. For other ideas on how to meet and connect with other artists, check out the podcast episode about meeting artists.

Next: Practical Tips: Artists and Designers Networking Guide Part 2

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.