Wide Angle Perspective Techniques in Your Artwork

Ever notice that in one point and two point perspective that a supposedly square tile can look pretty strange in some of the more extreme areas? You can compensate with carefully thought out vanishing points. However, there are limits as painter Rob Adam’s explains in his Spherical Perspective tutorial:

“So here we go… We might assume from what we are taught about perspective that this is the way we actually see. But it’s not. In the outside world there are straight lines, so we put them that way into our pictures. We have developed complicated schemes of geometrical rules to guide us. We take photos with cameras that have lenses that carefully distort the world to make it fit with the expectation that straight line should be straight. But visually they are not.

Have you ever tried to draw that really large checker board floor? Somehow at the far right and left it goes all stretched. Do the same thing with circles on the floor and it gets really wild.”

My own understanding of spherical perspective, quadilinear perspective and cylindrical perspective definitely needs some expansion. If you’re like me and have trouble wraping your head around it, Rob’s tutorial can help.

Spherical Perspective (treeshark.com)

 

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Drawing portraits with more character

When drawing (or painting), the toughest part is capturing a persons personality. A face can be a huge part of creating an emotional connection in your art.  You can make or break the believability of the moment with a glint in the eye or a smirk in the lips.

I was reading the tutorials on the blog of MAD Magazine caricaturist Tom Richmond. Sure, he has a great anatomy tutorial on understanding hands that’s a must read. The tutorials on inking and digital coloring are amazing.  It’s his bread and butter, however, when he gets into the details of the face. 

Making a successful caricatures takes a pretty good understanding of the facial features. You have to capture a likeness. You have to manipulate them into an expressive statement.  From the blog:

“I would say there are three essential elements that transcend style and medium and must be present in a caricature:

Likeness- If you can’t tell who it is supposed to be, then it is not successful. All good caricatures incorporate a good likeness of their subjects.

Exaggeration- Without some form of exaggeration, or a departure from the exact representation of the subject’s features, all you have is a portrait. The level of exaggeration can vary wildly, but there must be some departure. A straight portrait is not a caricature.

Statement- I believe a caricature must editorialize in some way. The artist must be trying to say something about the subject. It might be something to do with the situation the subject is drawn in, it may just be a play on their personality through expression or body language, it might be a simple as making visual fun of some aspect of their persona or image.”

While you may not want to be a caricature artist, learning how to play with caricature can bring a lot into your facial drawing. Finding somewhere between photorealism and caricature might be the thing that takes your art to the next level. What do you think?

Tutorials on Tom’s MAD Blog (tomrichmond.com)

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

40 Guidelines for Composing a Landscape Painting

When creating artwork, finding the flaws in your own work can be difficult.  Furthering your understanding what works and what doesn’t can make this process far less frustrating.  The tutorial on art destination site and forum Wetcanvas has demystified the most common problems. From the article, by Johannes Vloothuis:

“I have put together a series of “ rules” (I’d prefer the word, tips) of composition that when used properly should reduce the flaws in your landscape paintings. These are a compilation of what appears in most books on composition plus some of my own ideas. A word of caution; do not allow these to hinder your work. They are to help you out when you are in doubt on where to place diverse elements in your work. Rules are made to be broken, in which case you should at least know what rule you are breaking and why and not err due to insufficient knowledge. There are 23 pages so get a cup of coffee and prepare yourself for a long haul.”

Landscape Composition Rules (wetcanvas.com)

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Want to be in the next inspiration and artist profile post?

This is a new upcoming feature on my blog. Every once in a while I’ll post a round up of the best in typography, design, painting and illustration.  How do you get featured?  Just join my new flickr group, Uncanny Creativity and add your artwork. Make sure you tag it appropriately. 

You can also go there to talk to your fellow artists and designers and discover even more work for yourself.  Tell your friends to join too!

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.

Taking Photos in Low Light (Infographic)

This infographic on low light photography comes from Snapsort. It has a ton of great tips such as taking a ton of photos in succession, camera settings and lens selection.

You may also want to check out our past guest posts on photography: Film Photography vs. Digital Photography by Claire Jarrett of Marketing By Web and Finding Your Own Photography Style by Sarah Gonski of loveandpaella.com

Brian E. Young is a graphic designer and artist in Baltimore, MD.